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Atherosclerosis. 2014 Dec;237(2):400-3. doi: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2014.09.017. Epub 2014 Sep 28.

Serum coenzyme Q10 and risk of disabling dementia: the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS).

Author information

1
Department of Public Health Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan; Osaka Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Osaka, Japan. Electronic address: yamagishi.kazumas.ge@u.tsukuba.ac.jp.
2
Department of Public Health, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan.
4
Department of Public Health Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan; Health Services and Systems Research, Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.
5
Department of Public Health Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan; Department of Public Health, Dokkyo Medical University, Mibu, Japan.
6
Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan; Department of Public Health, Dokkyo Medical University, Mibu, Japan.
7
Osaka Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Osaka, Japan; Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan.
8
School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo University of Technology, Hachioji, Japan.
9
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether coenzyme Q10, a potent antioxidant, is associated with risk of dementia, which has not yet been elucidated.

APPROACH AND RESULTS:

We performed a case-control study nested in a community-based cohort of approximately 6000 Japanese aged 40-69 years at baseline (1984-1994). Serum coenzyme Q10 was measured in 65 incident cases of disabling dementia with dementia-related behavioral disturbance or cognitive impairment incident between 1999 and 2004, and in 130 age-, sex- and baseline year-matched controls. Serum coenzyme Q10 was inversely associated with dementia: the multivariate odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 0.68 (0.26-1.78), 0.92 (0.33-2.56), and 0.23 (0.06-0.86) for individuals with the second, third, and highest quartiles of coenzyme Q10, respectively, as compared with the lowest quartile (P for trend = 0.05). A similar association was found for the coenzyme Q10/total cholesterol ratio: the respective ORs were 0.67 (0.25-1.78), 0.73 (0.28-1.92), and 0.21 (0.05-0.90) (P for trend = 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS:

Serum coenzyme Q10 levels were inversely associated with risk of disabling dementia.

KEYWORDS:

Antioxidant; Coenzyme Q10; Dementia; Epidemiology; Follow-up study

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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