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Neuroimage. 2015 Feb 1;106:55-71. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.11.009. Epub 2014 Nov 8.

Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex.

Author information

1
Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
2
Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
3
Dept. of Physics, FL International University, USA.
4
Research Imaging Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA.
5
Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany.
6
Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Cingulum NeuroSciences Institute and Boston University School of Medicine, 72 E. Concord Street, Boston, MA 02118, USA.
7
Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen, Germany.
8
Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany. Electronic address: S.Eickhoff@fz-juelich.de.

Abstract

The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-unconstrained but not task-constrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications.

KEYWORDS:

Connectivity-based parcellation; Default mode network; Functional decoding; Parietal lobe; Posterior cingulate cortex; Retrosplenial cortex; Statistical learning

PMID:
25462801
PMCID:
PMC4780672
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.11.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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