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Behav Res Ther. 2014 Dec;63:90-8. doi: 10.1016/j.brat.2014.09.010. Epub 2014 Oct 2.

Internet-based preventive intervention for reducing eating disorder risk: A randomized controlled trial comparing guided with unguided self-help.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Washington University in St. Louis, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8134, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, MC 5722, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
3
Department of Psychology, The College of William and Mary, Integrated Science Center, Room 1223, P.O. Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA 23187, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8134, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
5
Technische Universität Dresden, Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie, Chemnitzer Str. 46, D-01187 Dresden, Germany.
6
Department of Psychology, Washington University in St. Louis, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8134, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8134, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address: wilfleyd@psychiatry.wustl.edu.

Abstract

Student Bodies, an internet-based intervention, has successfully reduced weight/shape concerns and prevented eating disorders in a subset of college-age women at highest risk for an eating disorder. Student Bodies includes an online, guided discussion group; however, the clinical utility of this component is unclear. This study investigated whether the guided discussion group improves program efficacy in reducing weight/shape concerns in women at high risk for an eating disorder. Exploratory analyses examined whether baseline variables predicted who benefitted most. Women with high weight/shape concerns (N = 151) were randomized to Student Bodies with a guided discussion group (n = 74) or no discussion group (n = 77). Regression analyses showed weight/shape concerns were reduced significantly more among guided discussion group than no discussion group participants (p = 0.002; d = 0.52); guided discussion group participants had 67% lower odds of having high-risk weight/shape concerns post-intervention (p = 0.02). There were no differences in binge eating at post-intervention between the two groups, and no moderators emerged as significant. Results suggest the guided discussion group improves the efficacy of Student Bodies in reducing weight/shape concerns in college students at high risk for an eating disorder.

KEYWORDS:

Eating disorders; Guided self-help; Internet treatment; Prevention; Randomized controlled trial

PMID:
25461783
PMCID:
PMC4383716
DOI:
10.1016/j.brat.2014.09.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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