Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Environ Int. 2015 Feb;75:93-102. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2014.11.008. Epub 2014 Nov 19.

Circulating levels of environmental contaminants are associated with dietary patterns in older adults.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: erika.ax@pubcare.uu.se.
2
Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: erik.lampa@medsci.uu.se.
3
Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: lars.lind@medsci.uu.se.
4
Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: samira.salihovic@medsci.uu.se.
5
MTM Research Centre, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. Electronic address: Bert.VanBavel@oru.se.
6
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: tommy.cederholm@pubcare.uu.se.
7
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: per.sjogren@pubcare.uu.se.
8
Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: monica.lind@medsci.uu.se.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Food intake contributes substantially to our exposure to environmental contaminants. Still, little is known about our dietary habits' contribution to exposure variability.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to assess circulating levels of environmental contaminants in relation to predefined dietary patterns in an elderly Swedish population.

METHODS:

Dietary data and serum concentrations of environmental contaminants were obtained from 844 70-year-old Swedish subjects (50% women) in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study. Dietary data from 7-day food records was used to assess adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet, a low carbohydrate-high protein diet and the WHO dietary recommendations. Circulating levels of 6 polychlorinated biphenyl markers, 3 organochlorine pesticides, 1 dioxin and 1 polybrominated diphenyl ether, the metals cadmium, lead, mercury and aluminum and serum levels of bisphenol A and 4 phthalate metabolites were investigated in relation to dietary patterns in multivariate linear regression models.

RESULTS:

A Mediterranean-like diet was positively associated with levels of several polychlorinated biphenyls (118, 126, 153, and 209), trans-nonachlor and mercury. A low carbohydrate-high protein diet was positively associated with polychlorinated biphenyls 118 and 153, trans-nonachlor, hexachlorobenzene and p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, mercury and lead. The WHO recommended diet was negatively related to levels of dioxin and lead, and borderline positively to polychlorinated biphenyl 118 and trans-nonachlor.

CONCLUSION:

Dietary patterns were associated in diverse manners with circulating levels of environmental contaminants in this elderly Swedish population. Following the WHO dietary recommendations seems to be associated with a lower burden of environmental contaminants.

KEYWORDS:

Dietary patterns; Dietary recommendations; Environmental contaminants; Low carbohydrate diet; Mediterranean diet

PMID:
25461418
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2014.11.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center