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Nanomedicine. 2015 Feb;11(2):431-4. doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2014.10.003. Epub 2014 Nov 22.

Bio-inspired hard-to-soft interface for implant integration to bone.

Author information

1
Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC, Center for Craniofacial Molecular Biology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: yzhou@usc.edu.
2
Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC, Center for Craniofacial Molecular Biology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: mlsnead@usc.edu.
3
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering Research Center, School of Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA. Electronic address: ctamerler@ku.edu.

Abstract

Accomplishing full, functional integration at the host-to-biomaterial interface has been a critical roadblock in engineering implants with performance similar to biological materials. Molecular recognition-based self-assembly, coupled with biochemical signaling, may lead to controllable and predictable cellular differentiation at the implant interface. Here, we engineer a bio-inspired interface built upon a chimeric peptide. Binding to the biomaterial interface is achieved using a molecular recognition domain specific for the titanium/titanium alloy implant surface and a biochemical signal guiding stem cells to differentiate by activating the Wnt signaling pathway for bone formation. During a critical period of host cell growth and determination, the bioactive implant interface signals mouse, as well as human, stem cells to differentiate along osteogenic lineages. The Wnt-induced cells show enhanced mineral deposition in an extracellular matrix of their creation and an enhanced gene expression profile consistent with osteogenesis, thereby providing a bone-to-implant interface that promotes bone regeneration.

FROM THE CLINICAL EDITOR:

This team of authors studied methods for enhanced hard-to-soft interface for implant integration to bone, and demonstrate how a bio-inspired surface built upon a chimeric peptide may be utilized for this purpose.

KEYWORDS:

Biomaterial interface; Bone regeneration; Chimeric peptide; Osteogenesis; Wnt signaling

PMID:
25461292
PMCID:
PMC4330108
DOI:
10.1016/j.nano.2014.10.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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