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Biosens Bioelectron. 2015 Mar 15;65:314-9. doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2014.10.017. Epub 2014 Oct 16.

A new aptamer/graphene interdigitated gold electrode piezoelectric sensor for rapid and specific detection of Staphylococcus aureus.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, China.
2
State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, China. Electronic address: fengjiao87799232@hotmail.com.

Abstract

A novel aptamer/graphene interdigitated gold electrode piezoelectric sensor was developed for the rapid and specific detection of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) by employing S. aureus aptamer as a biological recognition element. 4-Mercaptobenzene-diazonium tetrafluoroborate (MBDT) salt was used as a molecular cross-linking agent to chemically bind graphene to interdigital gold electrodes (IDE) that are connected to a series electrode piezoelectric quartz crystal (SPQC). S. aureus aptamers were assembly immobilized onto graphene via the π-π stacking of DNA bases. Due to the specific binding between S. aureus and aptamer, when S. aureus is present, the DNA bases interacted with the aptamer, thereby dropping the aptamer from the surface of the graphene. The electric parameters of the electrode surface was changed and resulted in the change of oscillator frequency of the SPQC. This detection was completed within 60min. The constructed sensor demonstrated a linear relationship between resonance frequency shifts with bacterial concentrations ranging from 4.1×10(1)-4.1×10(5)cfu/mL with a detection limit of 41cfu/mL. The developed strategy can detect S. aureus rapidly and specifically for clinical diagnosis and food testing.

KEYWORDS:

Aptamer; Diazonium salts; Graphene; IDE-SPQC; Rapid detection; Staphylococcus aureus

PMID:
25461175
DOI:
10.1016/j.bios.2014.10.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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