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Environ Res. 2015 Jan;136:75-81. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2014.10.014. Epub 2014 Nov 20.

Blood α-synuclein in agricultural pesticide handlers in central Washington State.

Author information

1
University of Washington, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Box 357234, Seattle, WA 98195, USA; University of Washington, Department of Neurology, Box 359775, Seattle, WA 98195-9775, USA. Electronic address: ssn@uw.edu.
2
University of California San Diego, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Electronic address: hcheckoway@ucsd.edu.
3
University of Washington, Department of Pathology, Box 359635, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address: zhangj@uw.edu.
4
National Cancer Institute, Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, 9609 Medical Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: hofmannjn@mail.nih.gov.
5
National Farm Medicine Center, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, 1000 North Oak Avenue, Marshfield, WI 54449, USA. Electronic address: Keifer.matthew@mcrf.mfldclin.edu.
6
University of Washington, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Box 357234, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address: mpaulsen@uw.edu.
7
University of Washington, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Box 357234, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address: freddy@uw.edu.
8
University of Washington, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Box 357234, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address: ttjc@u.washington.edu.
9
University of Washington, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Box 357234, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address: simpson1@uw.edu.

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies suggest that occupational exposure to pesticides might increase Parkinson disease risk. Some pesticides, such as the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos, appear to increase the expression of α-synuclein, a protein critically involved in Parkinson disease. Therefore, we assessed total blood cell α-synuclein in 90 specimens from 63 agricultural pesticide handlers, mainly Hispanic men from central Washington State, who participated in the state's cholinesterase monitoring program in 2007-2010. Additionally, in age-adjusted linear regression models for repeated measures, we assessed whether α-synuclein levels were associated with butyrylcholinesterase-chlorpyrifos adducts or cholinesterase inhibition measured in peripheral blood, or with self-reported pesticide exposure or paraoxonase (PON1) genotype. There was no evidence by any of those indicators that exposure to chlorpyrifos was associated with greater blood α-synuclein. We observed somewhat greater α-synuclein with the PON1-108T (lower paraoxonase enzyme) allele, and with ≥ 10 h of exposure to cholinesterase inhibiting insecticides in the preceding 30 days, but neither of these associations followed a clear dose-response pattern. These results suggest that selected genetic and environmental factors may affect α-synuclein blood levels. However, longitudinal studies with larger numbers of pesticide handlers will be required to confirm and elucidate the possible associations observed in this exploratory cross-sectional study.

KEYWORDS:

Aryldialkylphosphatase; Chlorpyrifos; Parkinson disease; Pesticides; α-Synuclein

PMID:
25460623
PMCID:
PMC4548290
DOI:
10.1016/j.envres.2014.10.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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