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Environ Res. 2015 Jan;136:57-66. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2014.10.009. Epub 2014 Nov 20.

Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants in California women's serum and residential dust.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, 50 University Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. Electronic address: ToddPWhitehead@Berkeley.edu.
2
Environmental Chemistry Laboratory, California Department of Toxic Substances Control, 700 Heinz Ave, Berkeley, CA 94710, USA; Sequoia Foundation, 2166 Avenida De La Playa, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Electronic address: Sabrina.CrispoSmith@DTSC.CA.gov.
3
Environmental Chemistry Laboratory, California Department of Toxic Substances Control, 700 Heinz Ave, Berkeley, CA 94710, USA. Electronic address: June-Soo.Park@DTSC.CA.gov.
4
Environmental Chemistry Laboratory, California Department of Toxic Substances Control, 700 Heinz Ave, Berkeley, CA 94710, USA. Electronic address: Myrto.Petreas@DTSC.CA.gov.
5
School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, 50 University Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. Electronic address: SRappaport@Berkeley.edu.
6
School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, 50 University Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. Electronic address: CMetayer@Berkeley.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Humans are exposed to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) through various routes, including consumption of contaminated food and accidental ingestion of settled dust.

OBJECTIVES:

We aimed to identify key routes of exposure to organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in California women of reproductive age.

METHODS:

Blood was collected from 48 mothers participating in the California Childhood Leukemia Study from 2006 to 2007 and analyzed for POPs using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariable linear regression models of natural-log transformed serum concentrations were used to identify determinants of exposure from available questionnaire information on dietary habits, reproductive history, and demographic characteristics, as well as vacuum cleaner dust-POP levels.

RESULTS:

After adjusting for blood lipid levels, age, body mass index, cumulative lactation, and sampling date, serum concentrations of multiple major PCBs were positively associated with fish consumption, but not dust-PCB levels. After adjusting for blood lipid levels, Hispanic ethnicity, country of origin, and household annual income, serum concentrations of multiple major PBDEs were positively associated with dust-PBDE levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that the relative contribution of specific exposure routes to total POP intake varies by chemical class, with dust being a relatively important source of PBDEs and diet being a relatively important source of PCBs.

KEYWORDS:

Environmental monitoring; House dust; Organochlorine pesticides; Polybrominated diphenyl ethers; Polychlorinated biphenyls

PMID:
25460621
PMCID:
PMC4262624
DOI:
10.1016/j.envres.2014.10.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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