Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Infant Behav Dev. 2014 Nov;37(4):772-86. doi: 10.1016/j.infbeh.2014.09.003. Epub 2014 Nov 11.

Patterns of mother-infant interaction from 3 to 12 months among dyads with substance abuse and psychiatric problems.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: torill.siqveland@psykologi.uio.no.
2
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway; National Network for Infant Mental Health in Norway, The Center for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Eastern and Southern Norway, Norway.
3
The Center for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Eastern and Southern Norway, Norway; Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Norway.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the development of mother-infant interaction patterns from 3 to 12 months among three groups of mother-baby pairs recruited during pregnancy: one group from residential substance abuse treatment (n=28), a second group from psychiatric outpatient treatment (n=22), and a third group from well-baby clinics (n=30). The mother-infant interaction at 3 and 12 months was assessed by the Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment (PCERA), which consists of maternal, child and dyadic subscales (Clark, 2006). Linear mixed effects models were used to analyze group differences and the changes in mother-infant interaction from 3 to 12 months. At 3 months, pairwise comparisons showed that the group with psychiatric problems had significantly more difficulties in the mother-infant interaction than the two other groups. The group with substance abuse problems was not significantly different from the two other groups. At 12 months, the mother-infant pairs in the substance abuse group showed significantly more relational disturbances than the non-clinical pairs, as well as a poorer affective quality of interaction than the dyads in the group with psychiatric problems. Analysis of change from 3 to 12 months showed that difficulties in the interaction increased among the mother-baby pairs in the substance abuse group, while improvements were displayed in the two other groups. These results underline that mother-infant pairs at double risk due to maternal substance abuse and other non-optimal factors, are in need for long-term follow up in order to prevent the development of negative interactional patterns.

KEYWORDS:

Long-term interaction patterns; Maternal substance abuse and psychiatric problems; Mother–infant interaction

PMID:
25459795
DOI:
10.1016/j.infbeh.2014.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center