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Neuron. 2014 Nov 19;84(4):681-96. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.09.007. Epub 2014 Nov 19.

Studying brain organization via spontaneous fMRI signal.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address: jonathan.power@nih.gov.
2
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Psychology, Washington University in Saint Louis, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA; Department of Neurosurgery, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in Saint Louis, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA.

Abstract

In recent years, some substantial advances in understanding human (and nonhuman) brain organization have emerged from a relatively unusual approach: the observation of spontaneous activity, and correlated patterns in spontaneous activity, in the "resting" brain. Most commonly, spontaneous neural activity is measured indirectly via fMRI signal in subjects who are lying quietly in the scanner, the so-called "resting state." This Primer introduces the fMRI-based study of spontaneous brain activity, some of the methodological issues active in the field, and some ways in which resting-state fMRI has been used to delineate aspects of area-level and supra-areal brain organization.

PMID:
25459408
PMCID:
PMC4254503
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2014.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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