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Am Heart J. 2014 Dec;168(6):812-22. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2014.07.007. Epub 2014 Jul 22.

Metal pollutants and cardiovascular disease: mechanisms and consequences of exposure.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL.
2
Leon H Charney Division of Cardiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY.
3
Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY.
4
Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL; Columbia University Division of Cardiology at Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach FL.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

There is epidemiological evidence that metal contaminants may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis and its complications. Moreover, a recent clinical trial of a metal chelator had a surprisingly positive result in reducing cardiovascular events in a secondary prevention population, strengthening the link between metal exposure and cardiovascular disease (CVD). This is, therefore, an opportune moment to review evidence that exposure to metal pollutants, such as arsenic, lead, cadmium, and mercury, is a significant risk factor for CVD.

METHODS:

We reviewed the English-speaking medical literature to assess and present the epidemiological evidence that 4 metals having no role in the human body (xenobiotic), mercury, lead, cadmium, and arsenic, have epidemiologic and mechanistic links to atherosclerosis and CVD. Moreover, we briefly review how the results of the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) strengthen the link between atherosclerosis and xenobiotic metal contamination in humans.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is strong evidence that xenobiotic metal contamination is linked to atherosclerotic disease and is a modifiable risk factor.

PMID:
25458643
PMCID:
PMC4254412
DOI:
10.1016/j.ahj.2014.07.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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