Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Mol Med. 2014 Dec;20(12):685-93. doi: 10.1016/j.molmed.2014.10.007. Epub 2014 Nov 5.

Clock genes, pancreatic function, and diabetes.

Author information

1
CIBER de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabólicas Asociadas (CIBERDEM), 08033 Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: evieira@ciberdem.org.
2
Department of Pharmacological and Physiological Science, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63104, USA.
3
CIBER de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabólicas Asociadas (CIBERDEM), 08033 Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Bioingeniería, Universidad Miguel Hernández, 03202 Elche, Spain. Electronic address: ivanq@umh.es.

Abstract

Circadian physiology is responsible for the temporal regulation of metabolism to optimize energy homeostasis throughout the day. Disturbances in the light/dark cycle, sleep/wake schedule, or feeding/activity behavior can affect the circadian function of the clocks located in the brain and peripheral tissues. These alterations have been associated with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes. Animal models with molecular manipulation of clock genes and genetic studies in humans also support these links. It has been demonstrated that the endocrine pancreas has an intrinsic self-sustained clock, and recent studies have revealed an important role of clock genes in pancreatic β cells, glucose homeostasis, and diabetes.

KEYWORDS:

clock genes; diabetes; insulin; pancreas; β cell

PMID:
25457619
PMCID:
PMC4862830
DOI:
10.1016/j.molmed.2014.10.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center