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Med Clin North Am. 2015 Jan;99(1):221-35. doi: 10.1016/j.mcna.2014.09.003. Epub 2014 Nov 22.

Polycystic ovarian syndrome.

Author information

1
Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center, 4245 Roosevelt Way Northeast, Seattle, WA 98105, USA. Electronic address: tsubbu@uw.edu.

Abstract

Women with PCOS present with signs of chronic anovulation, hyperandrogenism, and metabolic abnormalities. The NIH recently embraced the Rotterdam criteria to broadly identify all the phenotypes of PCOS. Women with PCOS are often obese with insulin resistance and hence have an increased susceptibility to glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes. Future research should focus on the genetic, epigenetic, and environmental determinants of PCOS to develop new therapies to address the prevention of this disorder and its long-term complications.

KEYWORDS:

Anovulation; Hyperandrogenism; Infertility; Insulin resistance; Polycystic ovarian syndrome; Type 2 diabetes

PMID:
25456652
DOI:
10.1016/j.mcna.2014.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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