Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2015 Jan;19(1):56-63. doi: 10.1016/j.ejpn.2014.10.002. Epub 2014 Oct 12.

Antecedents and correlates of visual field deficits in children born extremely preterm.

Author information

1
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7489 Trondheim, Norway; Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, 136 Harrison Ave., Boston, MA 02111, USA. Electronic address: mari.holm@ntnu.no.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Section of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and JP Kennedy Research Center on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital, 5721 S. Maryland Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. Electronic address: mmsall@peds.bsd.uchicago.edu.
3
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7489 Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: jon.skranes@ntnu.no.
4
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, 136 Harrison Ave., Boston, MA 02111, USA; Neuroepidemiology Unit, Hannover School of Medicine, Hannover, Germany. Electronic address: olaf.dammann@tufts.edu.
5
Neurology Departments, Boston Children's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Au-414 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115-5724, USA. Electronic address: lizard@hsph.harvard.edu.
6
Neurology Departments, Boston Children's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Au-414 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115-5724, USA. Electronic address: alan.leviton@childrens.harvard.edu.

Abstract

AIM:

We sought to identify the antecedents and correlates of visual field deficits (VFDs) at age 2 years among infants born before the 28th week of gestation.

METHODS:

The visual fields of 1023 infants were assessed by confrontation at age 2 years. We compared the ante-and postnatal characteristics and exposures of the 65 infants with a VFD to their peers who did not have a VFD. We used time-oriented logistic regression risk models to assess the associations of potential antecedents and correlates with a VFD.

RESULTS:

In the final regression model, VFD was associated with maternal consumption of aspirin during the current pregnancy, recurring/persistent acidemia during the first 3 postnatal days, cerebral ventriculomegaly seen on neonatal ultrasound, prethreshold retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and supplemental oxygen and ventilator dependence at 36 weeks post-menstrual age. Birth before the 27th week was also associated with increased risk, but its significance was diminished by the addition of postnatal variables.

CONCLUSION:

In this sample of extremely preterm born infants, antenatal as well as early and late postnatal characteristics and exposures are associated with an increased risk of having a VFD. Our study adds to our knowledge about the complex etiology of visual deficits of prematurity, and supports a multifactorial cause of these deficits.

KEYWORDS:

Brain development; Prematurity; Preterm birth; ROP; Ventriculomegaly; Visual field deficits

PMID:
25455711
PMCID:
PMC4276499
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejpn.2014.10.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center