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Cancer Epidemiol. 2014 Dec;38(6):757-64. doi: 10.1016/j.canep.2014.10.002. Epub 2014 Oct 30.

Current depression among adult cancer survivors: findings from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

Author information

1
Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30345, USA. Electronic address: GZhao@cdc.gov.
2
Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30345, USA.
3
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30345, USA.
4
Northrop Grumman Corporation, Atlanta, GA 30345, USA.
5
Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30345, USA; Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30345, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A cancer diagnosis and subsequent treatments constitute a significantly increased psychological burden among cancer patients. This study examined the prevalence of current depression and the risk factors associated with a high burden of depression among cancer survivors in the US.

METHODS:

We analyzed data from 3550 cancer survivors (aged ≥ 18 years) and 26,917 adults without cancer who participated in the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-8 diagnostic algorithm. Participants with a total depression severity score of ≥ 10 were defined as having current depression. Prevalence and prevalence ratios were estimated by conducting log-linear regression analysis while controlling for potential confounders.

RESULTS:

Overall, 13.7% of cancer survivors (vs. 8.9% of adults without cancer, P < 0.001) reported having current depression; the prevalence varied significantly by cancer category. Among cancer survivors, after multivariate adjustment for covariates, cancer diagnosis within a year, being in 'other' racial/ethnic group, divorced, separated, widowed, or never married, current or former smoker, or having histories of diabetes, disability, or depression were associated with significantly higher prevalence ratios for current depression; whereas being at an advanced age (≥ 60 years old), attaining educational levels of >high school graduate, or engaging in leisure-time physical activity were associated with significantly lower prevalence ratios for current depression.

CONCLUSION:

Our results indicate that cancer survivors are at increased risk of current depression. Targeting cancer survivors at high risk of depressive issues may be especially important for clinical support and interventions aimed at improving mental well-being.

KEYWORDS:

BRFSS; Cancer survivor; Current depression; Depressive symptoms; Patient Health Questionnaire-8 (PHQ-8)

PMID:
25455653
DOI:
10.1016/j.canep.2014.10.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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