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Lancet. 2014 Nov 15;384(9956):1775-88. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61276-9. Epub 2014 Nov 14.

Non-psychotic mental disorders in the perinatal period.

Author information

1
Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. Electronic address: louise.howard@kcl.ac.uk.
2
Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK.
3
University of Toronto and Women's College Research Institute, Toronto, ON, Canada.
4
Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
6
Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VA, Australia.

Abstract

Mental disorders are among the most common morbidities of pregnancy and the postnatal period, and can have adverse effects on the mother, her child, and family. This Series paper summarises the evidence about epidemiology, risk factors, identification, and interventions for non-psychotic mental disorders. Although the phenomenology and risk factors for perinatal mental disorders are largely similar to those for the disorders at other times, treatment considerations differ during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Most randomised controlled trials have examined psychosocial and psychological interventions for postnatal depression, with evidence for effectiveness in treating and preventing the disorder. Few high-quality studies exist on the effectiveness or safety of pharmacological treatments in the perinatal period, despite quite high prescription rates. General principles of prescribing of drugs in the perinatal period are provided, but individual risk-benefit analyses are needed for decisions about treatment.

PMID:
25455248
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61276-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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