Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Vaccine. 2014 Dec 12;32(52):7175-8. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.10.015. Epub 2014 Oct 25.

Varicella-zoster virus vaccination under the exogenous boosting hypothesis: two ethical perspectives.

Author information

1
Department of Social Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE, United Kingdom; Centre for Health Economics Research and Modelling Infectious Diseases, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Institute, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium. Electronic address: jeroen.luyten@uantwerp.be.
2
Centre for Health Economics Research and Modelling Infectious Diseases, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Institute, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium.
3
Centre for Health Economics Research and Modelling Infectious Diseases, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Institute, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium; School of Public Health and Community Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes two diseases: varicella ('chickenpox') and herpes zoster ('shingles'). VZV vaccination of children reduces exposure to chickenpox in the population and it has been hypothesized that this could increase the prevalence of shingles. This 'exogenous boosting' effect of VZV raises an important equity concern: introducing a vaccination program could advance the health of one population group (children) at the expense of another (adults and elderly). We discuss the program's justifiability from two ethical perspectives, classic utilitarianism and contractualism. Whereas the former framework might offer a foundation for the case against introducing this vaccination, the latter offers a basis to justify it.

KEYWORDS:

Chickenpox; Equity; Immunization; Intergenerational; Justice; Shingles; Zona

PMID:
25454883
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.10.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center