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Sleep Med. 2014 Dec;15(12):1468-72. doi: 10.1016/j.sleep.2014.07.020. Epub 2014 Oct 8.

Electroencephalographic slow waves prior to sleepwalking episodes.

Author information

1
Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur, Montréal, Québec, Canada; Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
2
Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
3
Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur, Montréal, Québec, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
4
Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur, Montréal, Québec, Canada; Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Electronic address: antonio.zadra@umontreal.ca.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Recent studies have suggested that the onset of sleepwalking episodes may be preceded by fluctuations in slow-wave sleep electroencephalographic characteristics. However, whether or not such fluctuations are specific to sleepwalking episodes or generalized to all sleep-wake transitions in sleepwalkers remains unknown. The goal of this study was to compare spectral power for delta (1-4 Hz) and slow delta (0.5-1 Hz) as well as slow oscillation density before the onset of somnambulistic episodes versus non-behavioral awakenings recorded from the same group of sleepwalkers. A secondary aim was to describe the time course of observed changes in slow-wave activity and slow oscillations during the 3 min immediately preceding the occurrence of somnambulistic episodes.

METHODS:

Twelve adult sleepwalkers were investigated polysomnographically during the course of one night.

RESULTS:

Slow-wave activity and slow oscillation density were significantly greater prior to patients' somnambulistic episodes as compared with non-behavioral awakenings. However, there was no evidence for a gradual increase over the 3 min preceding the episodes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased slow-wave activity and slow oscillation density appear to be specific to sleepwalking episodes rather than generalized to all sleep-wake transitions in sleepwalkers.

KEYWORDS:

Parasomnia; Sleep EEG; Sleepwalking; Slow-wave activity; Slow-wave oscillations; Somnambulism

Comment in

PMID:
25454846
DOI:
10.1016/j.sleep.2014.07.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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