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J Infect Chemother. 2015 Feb;21(2):81-3. doi: 10.1016/j.jiac.2014.10.003. Epub 2014 Oct 31.

High rate of inducible clindamycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolates--a multicenter study in Tokyo, Japan.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Subspecialties, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: shoji-k@ncchd.go.jp.
2
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan; Center for Infectious Diseases and Infection Control, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Department of Education for Clinical Research, National Center for Child Health and Development, Japan.
5
Division of Microbiology, Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.
6
Center for Infectious Diseases and Infection Control, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan.
7
Division of Microbiology, Department of Laboratory, Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan.
8
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Subspecialties, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.
9
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Subspecialties, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Pediatrics, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata, Japan.

Abstract

The resistance of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) to antibiotics is an increasing problem. Clindamycin has been used as empiric therapy for the rising incidence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). As such, the local rate of inducible resistance against clindamycin is an important consideration. This multicenter study was conducted to identify the incidence of inducible clindamycin resistance of S. aureus isolates in Tokyo, the most populous city in Japan. A total of 2408 adult and pediatric samples were collected from a university hospital and two pediatric hospitals between January 2011 and December 2011. Among the 2341 samples analyzed, the incidence of inducible clindamycin resistance in erythromycin-resistant and clindamycin-susceptible/intermediate isolates was found to be 91% (n = 585), a figure much higher compared to most reports from other countries. In conclusion, we found a very high rate of inducible clindamycin resistance in macrolide-resistant S. aureus isolates in our geographic area.

KEYWORDS:

Antistaphylococcal; Clindamycin; Inducible resistance; MRSA; MSSA

PMID:
25454215
DOI:
10.1016/j.jiac.2014.10.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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