Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Respir Investig. 2014 Nov;52(6):357-64. doi: 10.1016/j.resinv.2014.07.002. Epub 2014 Sep 4.

Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with inoperable or residual chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: a preliminary study.

Author information

1
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan; Division of Rehabilitation, Chiba University Hospital, Japan. Electronic address: inagaki-tb@hospital.chiba-u.jp.
2
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan. Electronic address: jirotera@chiba-u.jp.
3
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan. Electronic address: ntanabe@faculty.chiba-u.jp.
4
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan. Electronic address: chumito_03@yahoo.co.jp.
5
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan. Electronic address: daikasai6075@yahoo.co.jp.
6
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan. Electronic address: sugiura@js3.so-net.ne.jp.
7
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan. Electronic address: ayakosh@nifty.com.
8
Division of Rehabilitation, Chiba University Hospital, Japan. Electronic address: asayumi@faculty.chiba-u.jp.
9
Division of Rehabilitation, Chiba University Hospital, Japan. Electronic address: atsushi_murata@faculty.chiba-u.jp.
10
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan. Electronic address: tsushimakenji@yahoo.co.jp.
11
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan. Electronic address: ytada@faculty.chiba-u.jp.
12
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan. Electronic address: sakaos@faculty.chiba-u.jp.
13
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan. Electronic address: tatsumi@faculty.chiba-u.jp.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) has recently improved because of advances in pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA), balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA), and disease-targeted medications. However, patients with inoperable CTEPH or persistent pulmonary hypertension (PH) after these interventions continue to exhibit impaired exercise capacity and limited quality of life (QOL).

METHODS:

Eight patients with inoperable or residual CTEPH (mean age, 64±12 years; WHO functional class II/III, 6/2; mean pulmonary artery pressure, 47±13 mmHg) in stable condition and receiving disease-targeted medications participated in a 12-week home-based pulmonary rehabilitation program (muscle strength training, respiratory exercises, and walking) with supervised hospital sessions from March 2012 to January 2014. Efficacy parameters were prospectively evaluated at baseline and at completion of the 12-week program.

RESULTS:

After completion of the pulmonary rehabilitation program, the 6-minute walking distance (6MWD) (33.3±25.1 m), St. George׳s Respiratory Questionnaire activity score, quadriceps force, and 7-day physical activity level were significantly improved compared with baseline. All subjects completed the rehabilitation program. Although one patient experienced presyncope during the in-hospital exercise sessions, no other severe adverse events or complications of pulmonary rehabilitation were observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that home-based pulmonary rehabilitation with closely supervised sessions may safely improve exercise capacity, leg muscle strength, general activity in daily life and health-related QOL in CTEPH patients.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension; Exercise training; Health-related quality Of life; Physical activity; Pulmonary rehabilitation

PMID:
25453379
DOI:
10.1016/j.resinv.2014.07.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center