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Clin Geriatr Med. 2015 Feb;31(1):17-27, vii. doi: 10.1016/j.cger.2014.08.017. Epub 2014 Oct 16.

Antidiabetic medications and polypharmacy.

Author information

1
Geriatric Pharmacotherapy Program, Department of Pharmacotherapy & Outcomes Science, Virginia Commonwealth University, Smith Building, Room 338, 410 North 12th Street, PO Box 980533, Richmond, VA 23298-0533, USA. Electronic address: epperon@vcu.edu.
2
Geriatric Pharmacotherapy Program, Department of Pharmacotherapy & Outcomes Science, Virginia Commonwealth University, Smith Building, Room 336, 410 North 12th Street, PO Box 980533, Richmond, VA 23298-0533, USA.
3
Geriatric Pharmacotherapy Program, Department of Pharmacotherapy & Outcomes Science, Virginia Commonwealth University, Smith Building, Room 220B, 410 North 12th Street, PO Box 980533, Richmond, VA 23298-0533, USA.

Abstract

Polypharmacy, or the use of multiple medications, is a serious concern for providers who care for older adults, as polypharmacy is associated with medication nonadherence, drug-drug interactions, drug-disease interactions, and adverse drug events. Multiple medications, high chronic disease burden, and age-related physiologic changes make management of older adults with diabetes increasingly difficult. Given high medication burden and potential for increased medication sensitivity in this patient population, it is prudent that providers are aware of potential risks and benefits of antidiabetic medications and implement shared decision-making practices to ensure appropriate care for older adults with diabetes.

KEYWORDS:

Adverse drug events; Diabetic complications; Geriatric syndromes; Hypoglycemic agents; Polypharmacy

PMID:
25453298
PMCID:
PMC4860345
DOI:
10.1016/j.cger.2014.08.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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