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Int J Med Inform. 2015 Feb;84(2):87-100. doi: 10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2014.10.001. Epub 2014 Oct 12.

Dashboards for improving patient care: review of the literature.

Author information

1
Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, USA; Center for Health Care Policy and Research, Visiting Nursing Service of New York, New York, USA. Electronic address: dd2724@columbia.edu.
2
School of Healthcare, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
3
Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
4
Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria.
5
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
6
CICESE, Ensenada, Mexico.
7
National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network Coordinating Centre, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
8
Health and Social Care Information Centre, Leeds, UK.
9
School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences, University of Salford, Salford, UK.
10
School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada.
11
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Abstract

AIM:

This review aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of evidence for the use of clinical and quality dashboards in health care environments.

METHODS:

A literature search was performed for the dates 1996-2012 on CINAHL, Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, PsychInfo, Science Direct and ACM Digital Library. A citation search and a hand search of relevant papers were also conducted.

RESULTS:

One hundred and twenty two full text papers were retrieved of which 11 were included in the review. There was considerable heterogeneity in implementation setting, dashboard users and indicators used. There was evidence that in contexts where dashboards were easily accessible to clinicians (such as in the form of a screen saver) their use was associated with improved care processes and patient outcomes.

CONCLUSION:

There is some evidence that implementing clinical and/or quality dashboards that provide immediate access to information for clinicians can improve adherence to quality guidelines and may help improve patient outcomes. However, further high quality detailed research studies need to be conducted to obtain evidence of their efficacy and establish guidelines for their design.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical dashboard; Decision making, computer assisted; Decision support systems, clinical; Performance measurement; Quality indicators, health care

PMID:
25453274
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2014.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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