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Addict Behav. 2015 Feb;41:142-7. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.10.019. Epub 2014 Oct 23.

Prevalence and correlates of electronic-cigarette use in young adults: findings from three studies over five years.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, 401 Parnassus Avenue, Box TRC 0984, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. Electronic address: danielle.ramo@ucsf.edu.
2
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, 2000 Broadway-3rd floor, Oakland, CA 94612, USA. Electronic address: kelly.c.young-wolff@kp.org.
3
Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Medical School Office Building, 1265 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94305-5411, USA. Electronic address: jpro@stanford.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We aimed to examine prevalence and correlates of past-month electronic cigarette ("e-cigarette") use and use of e-cigarettes to aid a cessation attempt in three samples of young adult smokers recruited online in 2009-2010 (Study 1), 2010-2011 (Study 2), and 2013 (Study 3).

METHODS:

Participants were young adults aged 18 to 25 who smoked at least one cigarette in the previous month (Study 1, N=1987 and Study 2, N=570) or smoked 3 or more days each week and used Facebook 4 or more days per week (Study 3, N=79). We examined both past-month e-cigarette use and ever use of e-cigarettes to quit conventional cigarettes.

RESULTS:

Prevalence of past-month use of e-cigarettes was higher in each subsequent study: Study 1 (6%), Study 2 (19%), and Study 3 (41%). In multivariate analyses, significant correlates of past-month e-cigarette use were identified for Study 1 (male sex OR=2.1, p=.03; past-year quit attempt OR=1.6, p=.03) and Study 2 (male sex, OR=1.7, p=.03; younger age OR=0.88, p=.05), but not Study 3. In multivariate analyses, significant correlates of ever use of e-cigarette to quit conventional cigarettes were identified for Study 1 (education, OR=1.2, p=.02; smoking within 30min of waking, OR=2.8, p=.02; past year quit attempt OR=4.1, p=.02), and Study 3 (desire to quit smoking, OR=1.3, p=.02), but not Study 2.

CONCLUSIONS:

E-cigarette use is increasingly common among young adults, particularly men. E-cigarette use for quitting conventional cigarettes appears more common among those more nicotine dependent and interested in quitting.

KEYWORDS:

E-cigarette; ENDS; Electronic cigarette; Smoking; Vaping; Young adults

PMID:
25452058
PMCID:
PMC4314311
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.10.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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