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Zoology (Jena). 2015 Apr;118(2):135-40. doi: 10.1016/j.zool.2014.06.005. Epub 2014 Sep 28.

Current directions and future perspectives from the third Nematostella research conference.

Author information

1
Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 45 Water Street, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA. Electronic address: atarrant@whoi.edu.
2
Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
3
Department of Biological Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Woodward Hall 245, Charlotte, NC 28223, USA.
4
The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900, Israel.
5
Department of Molecular Evolution and Development, University of Vienna, Althanstr. 14, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.
6
Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience, University of Florida, 9505 Ocean Shore Boulevard, St. Augustine, FL 32136, USA.

Abstract

The third Nematostella vectensis Research Conference took place in December 2013 in Eilat, Israel, as a satellite to the 8th International Conference on Coelenterate Biology. The starlet sea anemone, N. vectensis, has emerged as a powerful cnidarian model, in large part due to the extensive genomic and transcriptomic resources and molecular approaches that are becoming available for Nematostella, which were the focus of several presentations. In addition, research was presented highlighting the broader utility of this species for studies of development, circadian rhythms, signal transduction, and gene-environment interactions.

KEYWORDS:

Cnidaria; Developmental biology; Genomics; Nematostella vectensis; Transcriptomics

PMID:
25450665
PMCID:
PMC4786491
DOI:
10.1016/j.zool.2014.06.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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