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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2015 Mar;96(3):478-83. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2014.10.001. Epub 2014 Oct 23.

Comparison of self-report sleep measures for individuals with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury.

Author information

1
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Electronic address: fogelber@uw.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
3
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate self-report measures of sleep disturbances and sleep-related impairments in samples of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) or spinal cord injury (SCI).

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional survey.

SETTING:

Community based.

PARTICIPANTS:

Adults (age ≥18y) (N=700) with either MS (n=461) or SCI (n=239) who were enrolled in a longitudinal survey of self-reported health outcomes and who completed self-report sleep measures at 1 time point.

INTERVENTIONS:

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS-S), Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) sleep disturbance short form, and PROMIS sleep-related impairments short form.

RESULTS:

Mean scores on the MOS-S sleep index II were significantly worse for both the MS and SCI samples than those of previously reported samples representative of the U.S. general population (P<.0001 for each group). The PROMIS sleep disturbance short form and PROMIS sleep-related impairments short form scores of the MS sample were also significantly different from those reported for the calibration cohort (P<.0001 on each scale). However, although the scores of the SCI sample were significantly different from those of the comparison cohort for the PROMIS sleep-related impairments short form (P=.045), the differences on the PROMIS sleep disturbance short form were not significant (P=.069).

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the MOS-S scores for the MS and SCI cohorts clearly indicated significantly high levels of sleep-related problems and were consistent with existing literature, the more ambiguous findings from the PROMIS sleep disturbance short form and PROMIS sleep-related impairments short form suggest that not enough is currently known about how these instruments function when applied to those with chronic neurologic dysfunction.

KEYWORDS:

Multiple sclerosis; Questionnaires; Rehabilitation; Self report; Sleep; Spinal cord injuries

PMID:
25450136
PMCID:
PMC4339494
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2014.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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