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Int J Infect Dis. 2014 Dec;29:274-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2014.08.008. Epub 2014 Oct 24.

Influence of preoperative skin sealing with cyanoacrylate on microbial contamination of surgical wounds following trauma surgery: a prospective, blinded, controlled observational study.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University Medicine, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Greifswald, Germany.
2
Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Clinic of Surgery, University Medicine, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Greifswald, Germany.
3
Department for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Control, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: ojan.assadian@meduniwien.ac.at.
4
Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, University Medicine, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Greifswald, Germany.
5
Department for General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery, Vivantes Humboldt-Klinikum, Berlin, Germany.
6
Heart Centre Leipzig GmbH, University Clinic Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
7
Hygiene Nord GmbH, Greifswald, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Intraoperative bacterial contamination is a risk factor for surgical site infections (SSIs). This prospective, randomized, blinded, controlled trial (Reg. No. BB08/12) investigated the effect of a cyanoacrylate-based skin sealant (InteguSeal) on intraoperative wound contamination during trauma surgery.

METHODS:

A total of 128 patients undergoing trauma surgery were assigned randomly to an intervention (n=62) or a control group (n=66). Surgical sites were investigated at three locations: maximum incision depth (base), wound margin prior to wound closure (margin), and the surgical sutures (suture). Colony-forming units (CFU) were counted after 48h of incubation.

RESULTS:

Overall, significantly lower CFU counts were obtained for samples from the intervention group at all three sample sites compared to the control group. The difference, however, was only significant for the suture site (p=0.040).

CONCLUSIONS:

Preoperative sealing reduced microbial contamination on sutures during surgery, while the overall wound contamination remained unchanged. Hence, prevention of the clinically more relevant deep SSIs may not be expected. However, this study was not designed to detect differences in the rate of SSI. The role of the reduction in suture contamination with regard to the prevention of SSI remains to be evaluated.

KEYWORDS:

Cyanoacrylate; InteguSeal; Microbial sealant; Prevention; SSI; Wound

PMID:
25449258
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijid.2014.08.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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