Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Drug Discov Today. 2015 Apr;20(4):491-5. doi: 10.1016/j.drudis.2014.10.010. Epub 2014 Oct 30.

The suprachoroidal pathway: a new drug delivery route to the back of the eye.

Author information

1
Discipline of Pharmacy, School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, VIC 3083, Australia.
2
Drug Discovery, Delivery and Patient Care (DDDPC) Theme, School of Pharmacy and Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Computing and Engineering, Kingston University London, Kingston-upon-Thames KT1 2EE, UK; Pharmaceutics Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Minia University, Minia, Egypt.
3
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA.
4
Drug Discovery, Delivery and Patient Care (DDDPC) Theme, School of Pharmacy and Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Computing and Engineering, Kingston University London, Kingston-upon-Thames KT1 2EE, UK.
5
Drug Discovery, Delivery and Patient Care (DDDPC) Theme, School of Pharmacy and Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Computing and Engineering, Kingston University London, Kingston-upon-Thames KT1 2EE, UK; School of Pharmacy, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. Electronic address: r.alany@auckland.ac.nz.

Abstract

The development of safe and convenient drug delivery strategies for treatment of posterior segment eye diseases is challenging. Although intravitreal injection has wide acceptance amongst clinicians, its use is associated with serious side-effects. Recently, the suprachoroidal space (SCS) has attracted the attention of ophthalmologists and pharmaceutical formulators as a potential site for drug administration and delivery to the posterior segment of the eye. This review highlights the major constraints of drug delivery to the posterior eye segment, key anatomical and physiological features of the SCS and drug delivery applications of this route with emphasis on microneedles along with future perspectives.

PMID:
25448755
DOI:
10.1016/j.drudis.2014.10.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center