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Physiol Behav. 2015 Jan;138:313-8. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.10.013. Epub 2014 Oct 20.

Effects of daytime light exposure on cognitive brain activity as measured by the ERP P300.

Author information

1
Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577, Japan. Electronic address: yos-okamoto@aist.go.jp.
2
Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577, Japan.

Abstract

Exposure to light modulates not only human alertness but also cognitive functions. The present study examined the temporal dynamics of the effects of light exposure on cortical activity related to cognitive processes. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were measured while participants performed an auditory oddball task during exposure to short-, medium- or long-wavelength light or darkness. Experiments were conducted in the daytime. After a 10-min period of darkness, one of the three lights was presented for 28 min. In the control condition, darkness was maintained for the entire session. The ERP component observed approximately 300 ms after the onset of the target stimulus (P300) was analyzed. The amplitude of P300 was larger after 5-20 min of exposure to short-wavelength light than at equivalent time points in the darkness. No differences were observed in the amplitude of P300 between the medium- or long-wavelength light condition and darkness at any time point. These results suggest that the amount of attentional resource allocated to the oddball task was increased by daytime exposure to short-wavelength light, and that following approximately 5 min of exposure the impact of light on cortical activity related to cognitive processes was able to be detected.

KEYWORDS:

Cognition; Daytime exposure; Event-related potential (ERP); Monochromatic light; Oddball task

PMID:
25447474
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.10.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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