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World J Surg. 2015 Apr;39(4):897-904. doi: 10.1007/s00268-014-2903-6.

A randomized controlled trial comparing post-operative pain in single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy versus conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Author information

1
Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, National University Health System, 1E Kent Ridge Road, NUHS Tower Block, Level 8, Singapore, 119228, Singapore, cfscky@nus.edu.sg.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

An increasing body of evidence is being published about single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC), but there are no well-powered trials with an adequate evaluation of post-operative pain. This randomized trial compares SILC against four-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) with post-operative pain as the primary endpoint.

METHODS:

Hundred patients were randomized to either SILC (n = 50) or LC (n = 50). Exclusion criteria were (1) Acute cholecystitis; (2) ASA 3 or above; (3) Bleeding disorders; and (4) Previous open upper abdominal surgery. Patients and post-operative assessors were blinded to the procedure performed. The site and severity of pain were compared at 4 h, 24 h, 14 days and 6 months post-procedure using the visual analog scale; non-inferiority was assumed when the lower boundary of the 95% confidence interval of the difference was above -1 and superiority when p ≤ 0.05.

RESULTS:

The study arms were demographically similar. At 24 h post-procedure, SILC was associated with less pain at extra-umbilical sites (rest: p = 0.004; movement: p = 0.008). Pain data were inconclusive at 24 h at the umbilical site on movement; SILC was otherwise non-inferior for pain at all other points. Operating duration was longer in SILC (79.46 vs 58.88 min, p = 0.003). 8% of patients in each arm suffered complications (p = 1.000). Re-intervention rates, analgesic use, return to function, and patient satisfaction did not differ significantly.

CONCLUSIONS:

SILC has improved short-term pain outcomes compared to LC and is not inferior in both short-term and long-term pain outcomes. The operating time is longer, but remains feasible in routine surgical practice.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01824186.

PMID:
25446490
DOI:
10.1007/s00268-014-2903-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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