Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2015 Jan-Feb;47:10-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ntt.2014.11.003. Epub 2014 Nov 13.

Prenatal marijuana exposure predicts marijuana use in young adulthood.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, 130 DeSoto Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA. Electronic address: kristen.sonon@gmail.com.
2
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. Electronic address: gar@pitt.edu.
3
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. Electronic address: jcornel@pitt.edu.
4
Department of Psychology in Education, School of Education, 5930 Wesley W. Posvar Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA.
5
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. Electronic address: nday@pitt.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies have reported effects of prenatal marijuana exposure (PME) on cognitive and behavioral outcomes. An earlier publication from this study found that PME predicted early onset of marijuana use and frequency of marijuana use at age 14. No study has reported the effects of PME on marijuana use in young adulthood. This is a developmental period when substance use peaks, and by which, initiation of substance use has largely occurred.

METHODS:

Subjects were from a longitudinal cohort. Women were interviewed initially in their fourth prenatal month and women and their offspring were followed through 22 years. Significant covariates of offspring marijuana use at 22 years were identified and controlled for using ordinal logistic regression.

RESULTS:

PME predicted marijuana use in the offspring at 22 years after controlling for significant covariates. Prenatal alcohol exposure, offspring race, gender, and age were also significant predictors, but family history of substance abuse or disorder, and sociodemographic and psychological characteristics of the mother and offspring were not. This association was not moderated by gender or race.

CONCLUSIONS:

PME is associated with subsequent marijuana use in young adulthood after considering the effects of other significant factors. These findings have important implications for public health given the recent trend toward legitimization of marijuana use.

KEYWORDS:

Marijuana use in young adults; Prenatal marijuana exposure

PMID:
25446014
PMCID:
PMC4381999
DOI:
10.1016/j.ntt.2014.11.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center