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Infect Genet Evol. 2015 Jan;29:216-29. doi: 10.1016/j.meegid.2014.10.032. Epub 2014 Nov 20.

Identification of new sub-genotypes of virulent Newcastle disease virus with potential panzootic features.

Author information

1
Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service-United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Athens, GA 30605, USA.
2
Kimron Veterinary Institute, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel.
3
Quality Operations Laboratory, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Out Fall Road, Lahore, Pakistan.
4
Poultry Research Laboratory, Department of Physiology, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan.
5
Department of Infectious Diseases & Veterinary Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine-Bogor Agricultural University, Jl. Agatis, IPB Dramaga, Bogor 16680, Indonesia.
6
Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service-United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Athens, GA 30605, USA. Electronic address: Claudio.Afonso@ars.usda.gov.

Abstract

Virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates from new sub-genotypes within genotype VII are rapidly spreading through Asia and the Middle East causing outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND) characterized by significant illness and mortality in poultry, suggesting the existence of a fifth panzootic. These viruses, which belong to the new sub-genotypes VIIh and VIIi, have epizootic characteristics and do not appear to have originated directly from other genotype VII NDV isolates that are currently circulating elsewhere, but are related to the present and past Indonesian NDV viruses isolated from wild birds since the 80s. Viruses from sub-genotype VIIh were isolated in Indonesia (2009-2010), Malaysia (2011), China (2011), and Cambodia (2011-2012) and are closely related to the Indonesian NDV isolated in 2007, APMV1/Chicken/Karangasem, Indonesia (Bali-01)/2007. Since 2011 and during 2012 highly related NDV isolates from sub-genotype VIIi have been isolated from poultry production facilities and occasionally from pet birds, throughout Indonesia, Pakistan and Israel. In Pakistan, the viruses of sub-genotype VIIi have replaced NDV isolates of genotype XIII, which were commonly isolated in 2009-2011, and they have become the predominant sub-genotype causing ND outbreaks since 2012. In a similar fashion, the numbers of viruses of sub-genotype VIIi isolated in Israel increased in 2012, and isolates from this sub-genotype are now found more frequently than viruses from the previously predominant sub-genotypes VIId and VIIb, from 2009 to 2012. All NDV isolates of sub-genotype VIIi are approximately 99% identical to each other and are more closely related to Indonesian viruses isolated from 1983 through 1990 than to those of genotype VII, still circulating in the region. Similarly, in addition to the Pakistani NDV isolates of the original genotype XIII (now called sub-genotype XIIIa), there is an additional sub-genotype (XIIIb) that was initially detected in India and Iran. This sub-genotype also appears to have as an ancestor a NDV strain from an Indian cockatoo isolated in 1982. These data suggest the existence of a new panzootic composed of viruses of subgenotype VIIi and support our previous findings of co-evolution of multiple virulent NDV genotypes in unknown reservoirs, e.g. as recorded with the virulent NDV identified in Dominican Republic in 2008. The co-evolution of at least three different sub-genotypes reported here and the apparent close relationship of some of those genotypes from ND viruses isolated from wild birds, suggests that identifying wild life reservoirs may help predict new panzootics.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; NDV; Newcastle disease; Outbreak; Panzootic; Poultry

PMID:
25445644
DOI:
10.1016/j.meegid.2014.10.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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