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Prev Med. 2015 Jan;70:39-45. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.11.006. Epub 2014 Nov 20.

Physical activity patterns and metabolic syndrome in Costa Rica.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, United States; Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States. Electronic address: hastertt@karmanos.org.
2
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, United States.
3
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States; Centro Centroamericano de Población, Universidad de Costa Rica, Costa Rica.
4
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, United States; Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether total physical activity or activity patterns are associated with metabolic syndrome and its components.

METHODS:

Participants include 1994 controls from a case-control study of non-fatal myocardial infarction in Costa Rica (1994-2004). Physical activity was assessed via self-administered questionnaire and patterns were identified using principal components analysis. Metabolic syndrome was assessed via blood samples and anthropometry measurements from in-home study visits. Prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using log binomial regression. Adjusted least squares means of metabolic syndrome components were calculated by quintile of total activity and pattern scores.

RESULTS:

Four activity patterns were identified: rest/sleep, agricultural, light indoor activity, and manual labor. Total activity was not associated with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome prevalence was 20% lower in participants with the highest scores on the agricultural job pattern compared to those with the lowest (PR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.68-0.94). Higher total activity was associated with lower triglycerides and lower HDL cholesterol. Higher scores on each pattern were inversely associated with metabolic syndrome components, particularly waist circumference and fasting blood glucose.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patterns or types of physical activity may be more strongly associated with metabolic syndrome and its components than total activity levels.

KEYWORDS:

Glucose; HDL cholesterol; Hypertension; Metabolic syndrome; Physical activity; Triglycerides; Waist circumference

PMID:
25445330
PMCID:
PMC4341893
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.11.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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