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Neuron. 2014 Nov 5;84(3):582-93. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.10.029. Epub 2014 Nov 5.

How clinical development can, and should, inform translational science.

Author information

1
Anticonvulsant Drug Development Program, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA.
2
Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, NYU Langone School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.
3
Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, NYU Langone School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. Electronic address: jacqueline.french@nyumc.org.

Abstract

There is an urgent need for preclinical translational efforts to be realized as breakthroughs in therapy for the many patients with life-altering conditions affecting the CNS. Despite intensive efforts, few transformative therapies have emerged, and many new potential therapies that looked promising in preclinical development have failed in the clinic. In this Perspective, we suggest that if preclinical scientists partner early with clinical scientists, they can begin to envision the pathway forward for their work through clinical trials. Options might include determining the populations to be treated, issues of dose selection, timing of intervention, duration of intervention, and the availability of biomarkers. In addition, understanding other factors that impact the likelihood that a proof-of-concept trial can be performed, as well as other critical issues, will altogether increase the attractiveness of the project to investors and partners and will also increase the likelihood that the intervention will succeed in the clinic.

PMID:
25442937
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2014.10.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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