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Am J Prev Med. 2015 Feb;48(2):162-169. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.08.030. Epub 2014 Nov 6.

Cost-benefit analysis simulation of a hospital-based violence intervention program.

Author information

1
Department of Health Management and Policy, Drexel University School of Public Health and Department of Emergency Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: jpp46@drexel.edu.
2
Department of Health Management and Policy, Drexel University School of Public Health and Department of Emergency Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Violent injury is a major cause of disability, premature mortality, and health disparities worldwide. Hospital-based violence intervention programs (HVIPs) show promise in preventing violent injury. Little is known, however, about how the impact of HVIPs may translate into monetary figures.

PURPOSE:

To conduct a cost-benefit analysis simulation to estimate the savings an HVIP might produce in healthcare, criminal justice, and lost productivity costs over 5 years in a hypothetical population of 180 violently injured patients, 90 of whom received HVIP intervention and 90 of whom did not.

METHODS:

Primary data from 2012, analyzed in 2013, on annual HVIP costs/number of clients served and secondary data sources were used to estimate the cost, number, and type of violent reinjury incidents (fatal/nonfatal, resulting in hospitalization/not resulting in hospitalization) and violent perpetration incidents (aggravated assault/homicide) that this population might experience over 5 years. Four different models were constructed and three different estimates of HVIP effect size (20%, 25%, and 30%) were used to calculate a range of estimates for HVIP net savings and cost-benefit ratios from different payer perspectives. All benefits were discounted at 5% to adjust for their net present value.

RESULTS:

Estimates of HVIP cost savings at the base effect estimate of 25% ranged from $82,765 (narrowest model) to $4,055,873 (broadest model).

CONCLUSIONS:

HVIPs are likely to produce cost savings. This study provides a systematic framework for the economic evaluation of HVIPs and estimates of HVIP cost savings and cost-benefit ratios that may be useful in informing public policy decisions.

PMID:
25442223
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2014.08.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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