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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2015 May;135(5):1179-85.e1-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2014.08.036. Epub 2014 Oct 31.

An acute cough-specific quality-of-life questionnaire for children: Development and validation.

Author information

1
Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: s.andersonjames@uq.edu.au.
2
Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
3
Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
4
Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
5
Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Emergency Medicine, Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia.
6
Department of Emergency Medicine, Mater Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia.
7
School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
8
Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia; Child Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patient-relevant outcome measures are essential for high-quality clinical research, and quality-of-life (QoL) tools are the current standard. Currently, there is no validated children's acute cough-specific QoL questionnaire.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to develop and validate the Parent-proxy Children's Acute Cough-specific QoL Questionnaire (PAC-QoL).

METHODS:

Using focus groups, a 48-item PAC-QoL questionnaire was developed and later reduced to 16 items by using the clinical impact method. Parents of children with a current acute cough (<2 weeks) at enrollment completed 2 validated cough score measures, the preliminary 48-item PAC-QoL, and 3 other questionnaires (the State Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI], the Short-Form 8-item 24-hour recall Health Survey [SF-8], and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress 21-item Scale [DASS21]). All measures were repeated on days 3 and 14.

RESULTS:

The median age of the 155 children enrolled was 2.3 years (interquartile range, 1.3-4.6). Median cough duration at enrollment was 3 days (interquartile range, 2-5). The reduced 16-item scale had high internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.95). Evidence for repeatability and criterion validity was shown by significant correlations between the domains and total PAC-QoL scores and the SF-8 (r = -0.36 and -0.51), STAI (r = -0.27 and -0.39), and DASS21 (r = -0.32 and -0.41) scales on days 0 and 3, respectively. The final PAC-QoL questionnaire was sensitive to change over time, with changes significantly relating to changes in cough score measures (P < .001).

CONCLUSION:

The 16-item PAC-QoL is a reliable and valid outcome measure that assesses QoL related to childhood acute cough at a given time point and reflects changes in acute cough-specific QoL over time.

KEYWORDS:

Children; acute cough; quality of life

PMID:
25441641
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2014.08.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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