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Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 2014 Nov;44(6):1113-29. doi: 10.1016/j.cvsm.2014.07.008. Epub 2014 Nov 1.

Aging in the canine and feline brain.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Section of Neurology & Neurosurgery, Department of Clinical Studies - Philadelphia, 3900 Delancey Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
2
Department of Pharmacology & Nutritional Sciences, Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, University of Kentucky, 800 South Limestone Street, 203 Sanders Brown Building, Lexington, KY 40515, USA. Electronic address: elizabeth.head@uky.edu.

Abstract

Aging dogs and cats show neurodegenerative features that are similar to human aging and Alzheimer disease. Neuropathologic changes with age may be linked to signs of cognitive dysfunction both in the laboratory and in a clinic setting. Less is known about cat brain aging and cognition and this represents an area for further study. Neurodegenerative diseases such as lysosomal storage diseases in dogs and cats also show similar features of human aging, suggesting some common underlying pathogenic mechanisms and also suggesting pathways that can be modified to promote healthy brain aging.

KEYWORDS:

Cat; Cognitive dysfunction; Dog; Neuron loss; Tau; β-Amyloid

PMID:
25441628
PMCID:
PMC4254595
DOI:
10.1016/j.cvsm.2014.07.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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