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Nutrition. 2015 Jan;31(1):38-44. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2014.04.017. Epub 2014 May 9.

Substituting sugar-sweetened beverages with water or milk is inversely associated with body fatness development from childhood to adolescence.

Author information

1
School of Molecular Bioscience, the University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Electronic address: mzhe4938@uni.sydney.edu.au.
2
School of Molecular Bioscience, the University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
3
Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Part of Copenhagen University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
4
Research Center of Childhood Health, Department of Exercise Epidemiology, Institute of Sport Sciences and Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark; Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
5
Research Center of Childhood Health, Department of Exercise Epidemiology, Institute of Sport Sciences and Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark.
6
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
7
Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Part of Copenhagen University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark; National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to examine the association between different types of beverage intake and substitution of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) by water, milk, or 100% fruit juice in relation to 6-y change in body fatness.

METHODS:

A cohort of 9-y-old children (N = 358) who participated in the Danish part of the European Youth Heart Study was followed for development of body fatness over 6 y. Multivariate linear regression was used to examine the associations between beverage intake at baseline and change in body fatness (body mass index z score [BMIz]), waist circumference (WC), and sum of four skinfolds (Σ4SF) over 6 y with adjustment for potential confounders. Substitution models were used to evaluate various beverages as alternatives to SSBs.

RESULTS:

SSB intake at age 9 y, but not intake of other beverages, was directly associated with subsequent 6-y changes in BMIz (β = 0.05; P = 0.02) and Σ4SF (β = 0.86; P = 0.02). Daily substitution of 100 g water for 100 g SSB was inversely associated with changes in BMIz (β = -0.04; P = 0.02), WC (β =-0.29; P = 0.04), and Σ4SF (β = -0.91; P = 0.02) over 6 y. Daily substitution of 100 g milk for 100 g SSB was also inversely associated with changes in BMIz (β = -0.05; P = 0.02), WC (β = -0.33; P = 0.046), and Σ4SF (β = -0.79; P = 0.06). No effect was observed for substitution of SSB by 100% fruit juice.

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that SSB intake is associated with long-term changes in body fatness in children, and replacing SSBs with water or milk, but not 100% fruit juice, is inversely associated with body fatness development.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Body fatness; Children; Substitution; Sugar-sweetened beverages

PMID:
25441586
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2014.04.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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