Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2015 Mar;24(3):439-45. doi: 10.1016/j.jse.2014.08.014. Epub 2014 Oct 16.

Prospective evaluation of clinical and radiologic factors predicting return to activity within 6 months after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

Author information

1
Saint-Grégoire Private Hospital Center, Saint-Grégoire, France.
2
Department of Orthopaedics, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia.
3
La Tour Hospital, Division of Internal Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
4
Southern Oregon Orthopedics, Medford, OR, USA; Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.
5
Division of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, La Tour Hospital, Meyrin, Switzerland; Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; Division of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, Department of Surgery, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: alexandre.laedermann@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study aimed to report the outcome of patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) and to determine the factors associated with return to work and activity.

MATERIALS:

Three hundred sixty-five patients who underwent ARCR were prospectively evaluated. The cohort was divided into 2 groups based on clinical results at 6 months. Group A consisted of patients who were considered to have a satisfactory outcome based on return to their previous professional or spare-time activities. Group B consisted of patients with an unsatisfactory outcome based on a lack of return to normal work or activities.

RESULTS:

Of the patients, 305 had a satisfactory outcome (group A) and 60 were categorized as having an unsatisfactory outcome (group B). On multivariate analysis, preoperative factors associated with group B included female gender and heavy manual labor. Postoperative bursitis on ultrasound at 6 months was associated with being in group B. Lack of tendon healing was not associated with group B. However, if a patient without healing had persistent pain at 6 months, the pain persisted at 9 months.

CONCLUSION:

ARCR is an effective procedure that leads to significant improvement in pain, function, and tendon healing in most cases. However, in 1 of 5 cases, patients were unable to resume normal activity at 6 months postoperatively. Persistent limitation at 6 months was associated with female gender, heavy manual workers, and the presence of postoperative persistent bursitis.

KEYWORDS:

Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair; double row; recovery of function; return to work; tendon non-healing or retear; treatment outcome; ultrasound; workers' compensation claim

PMID:
25441555
DOI:
10.1016/j.jse.2014.08.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center