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Cell Metab. 2014 Nov 4;20(5):719-730. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2014.10.016. Epub 2014 Nov 4.

Specialized metabolites from the microbiome in health and disease.

Author information

1
Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA.
2
Skaggs School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
3
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
4
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
5
Skaggs School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA; Department of Pharmacology, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
6
Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA. Electronic address: sarkis@caltech.edu.

Abstract

The microbiota, and the genes that comprise its microbiome, play key roles in human health. Host-microbe interactions affect immunity, metabolism, development, and behavior, and dysbiosis of gut bacteria contributes to disease. Despite advances in correlating changes in the microbiota with various conditions, specific mechanisms of host-microbiota signaling remain largely elusive. We discuss the synthesis of microbial metabolites, their absorption, and potential physiological effects on the host. We propose that the effects of specialized metabolites may explain present knowledge gaps in linking the gut microbiota to biological host mechanisms during initial colonization, and in health and disease.

PMID:
25440054
PMCID:
PMC4337795
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2014.10.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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