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Carbohydr Polym. 2015 Jan 22;115:16-24. doi: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2014.08.081. Epub 2014 Sep 2.

Development of tannic acid/chitosan/pullulan composite nanofibers from aqueous solution for potential applications as wound dressing.

Author information

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539, USA.
2
Department of Biology, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539, USA; Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539, USA.
3
Department of Biology, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539, USA.
4
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539, USA. Electronic address: lozanok@utpa.edu.

Abstract

This study presents the successful development of biocompatible tannic acid (TA)/chitosan (CS)/pullulan (PL) composite nanofibers (NFs) with synergistic antibacterial activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli. The NFs were developed utilizing the forcespinning(®) (FS) technique from CS-CA aqueous solutions to avoid the usage of toxic organic solvents. The ternary nanofibrous membranes were crosslinked to become water stable for potential applications as wound dressing. The morphology, structure, water solubility, water absorption capability and thermal properties of the NFs were characterized. The ternary composite membrane exhibits good water absorption ability with rapid uptake rate. This novel membrane favors fibroblast cell attachment and growth by providing a 3D environment which mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) in skin and allows cells to move through the fibrous structure resulting in interlayer growth throughout the membrane, thus favoring potential for deep and intricate wound healing.

KEYWORDS:

Aqueous solution; Chitosan; Composite nanofibers; Forcespinning(®); Tannic acid; Wound dressing

PMID:
25439862
DOI:
10.1016/j.carbpol.2014.08.081
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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