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Lancet Oncol. 2014 Nov;15(12):e568-80. doi: 10.1016/S1470-2045(14)70266-9. Epub 2014 Oct 26.

The biological and clinical effects of smoking by patients with cancer and strategies to implement evidence-based tobacco cessation support.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Oncology, Charleston, SC, USA; Department of Cell and Molecular Pharmacology Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: warrengw@musc.edu.
2
Department of Cell and Molecular Pharmacology Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; Department of Pharmacology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA.
3
Department of Behavioral Science, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.

Abstract

Tobacco use is an established risk factor for the development of several cancers; however, far less work has been done to understand the effects of continued smoking on cancer treatment outcomes, and structured tobacco cessation efforts are not well incorporated into the standard care for patients with cancer. In this Review we discuss the known biological effects of smoking on cancer cell biology and emphasise the clinical effects of continued smoking in patients with cancer treated with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Although evidence supports the need for inclusion of dedicated tobacco cessation efforts for patients with cancer, clinicians should consider the methods used to provide evidence-based tobacco cessation support and the available resources to deliver and maintain consistent tobacco cessation support. We also address the variables to consider in the design and implementation of a sustainable tobacco cessation programme.

PMID:
25439699
PMCID:
PMC5977974
DOI:
10.1016/S1470-2045(14)70266-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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