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Neurol Clin. 2014 Nov;32(4):979-91. doi: 10.1016/j.ncl.2014.07.007. Epub 2014 Sep 13.

Cerebellar infarction.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address: datar.sudhir@mayo.edu.
2
Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Abstract

Cerebellar infarction presents with symptoms of nausea, vomiting, and dizziness and thus mimics benign conditions such as viral gastroenteritis or labyrinthitis, which constitutes a good proportion of patients seen in the emergency department. A physician is often faced with the task of identifying the few cases in which cerebellar stroke is the underlying cause instead. In-depth knowledge of the signs and symptoms of cerebellar infarction is therefore essential. Large infarctions or the ones with hemorrhagic conversion can lead to tissue swelling and complications such as obstructive hydrocephalus and brainstem compression. This article summarizes the current multidisciplinary approach to cerebellar stroke.

KEYWORDS:

Ataxia; Cerebellar infarction; Cerebellar stroke; Posterior circulation stroke; Vertigo

PMID:
25439292
DOI:
10.1016/j.ncl.2014.07.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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