Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2014 Oct;28(4):431-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jtemb.2014.08.007. Epub 2014 Sep 8.

The effect of adding zinc to vitamin A on IGF-1, bone age and linear growth in stunted children.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition School of Public Health, Airlangga University, Surabaya 60115, Indonesia. Electronic address: anna_b_wirjatmadi@yahoo.com.
2
Department of Nutrition School of Public Health, Airlangga University, Surabaya 60115, Indonesia.

Abstract

A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial of a single dose of 200,000 I.U. of vitamin A with daily zinc supplementation was conducted with children in Mojo village, Surabaya City. Children aged 48 to 60 months were randomized to receive a single dose of 200,000 I.U. of vitamin A plus zinc sulfate (n=12) or a single dose of 200,000 I.U. of vitamin A (n=12) plus placebo six days a week for six months. Children were evaluated weekly for nutrient intake and for IGF-1, C-reactive protein levels, gamma globulin levels, serum zinc, serum retinol, bone age and the index height for age at six months. At the end of the study, there was a significant increase in the serum retinol level (p<0.03), serum zinc level (p<0.03), IGF-1 hormone (p<0.04) and Z-score height for age (p<0.001), bone age (p<0.01), and gamma globulin level (p<0.04) and a significant decrease in the amount of infection/inflammation measured by CRP level (p<0.001). There was also a significant correlation between CRP level and height for age (p<0.01), and between gamma level and height for age (p<0.01). These results suggest that combined vitamin A and zinc supplementation reduces the risk of infection and increases linear growth among children, and thus may play a key role in controlling infection and stunted growth for children under five years old.

KEYWORDS:

Bone age and linear growth (H/A); Gamma globulin; IGF-1; Stunting; Zinc and vitamin A supplementation on CRP

PMID:
25439136
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtemb.2014.08.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center