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J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Nov 30;107(1):380. doi: 10.1093/jnci/dju380. Print 2015 Jan.

Cost-effectiveness of population screening for BRCA mutations in Ashkenazi jewish women compared with family history-based testing.

Author information

1
Department of Gynaecological Oncology, St. Bartholomew's Hospital, West Smithfield, London, UK, (RM); Department of Women's Cancer, EGA Institute for Women's Health, University College London, London, UK (RM, MB, KL, SG, LS, NB, RD, UM, IJ); Department of Health Services Research and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK (RL); Department of Health Economics, London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London, UK (AM, MR); Behavioural Sciences Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK (JW); Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (SS); Department of Clinical Genetics, North East Thames Regional Genetics Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK (AK); NW Thames Regional Genetics Service, Kennedy Galton Centre, Middlesex, UK (HD); West Midlands Regional Genetics Laboratory, Birmingham Women's NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK (YW); Department of Clinical Genetics, West Midlands Regional Genetics Service, Birmingham Women's NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK (CC); South West Thames Molecular Genetics Diagnostic Laboratory, St George's University of London, London, UK (RT); Department of Clinical Genetics, Guy's Hospital, London, UK (CJ); Welcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Headington Oxford, UK (IT); Department Gynaecology, Shaare Zedek Medical Centre, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel (UB); School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences & Manchester Academic Health Science Center, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK (IJ).
2
Department of Gynaecological Oncology, St. Bartholomew's Hospital, West Smithfield, London, UK, (RM); Department of Women's Cancer, EGA Institute for Women's Health, University College London, London, UK (RM, MB, KL, SG, LS, NB, RD, UM, IJ); Department of Health Services Research and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK (RL); Department of Health Economics, London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London, UK (AM, MR); Behavioural Sciences Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK (JW); Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (SS); Department of Clinical Genetics, North East Thames Regional Genetics Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK (AK); NW Thames Regional Genetics Service, Kennedy Galton Centre, Middlesex, UK (HD); West Midlands Regional Genetics Laboratory, Birmingham Women's NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK (YW); Department of Clinical Genetics, West Midlands Regional Genetics Service, Birmingham Women's NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK (CC); South West Thames Molecular Genetics Diagnostic Laboratory, St George's University of London, London, UK (RT); Department of Clinical Genetics, Guy's Hospital, London, UK (CJ); Welcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Headington Oxford, UK (IT); Department Gynaecology, Shaare Zedek Medical Centre, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel (UB); School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences & Manchester Academic Health Science Center, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK (IJ). ian.jacobs@manchester.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Population-based testing for BRCA1/2 mutations detects the high proportion of carriers not identified by cancer family history (FH)-based testing. We compared the cost-effectiveness of population-based BRCA testing with the standard FH-based approach in Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) women.

METHODS:

A decision-analytic model was developed to compare lifetime costs and effects amongst AJ women in the UK of BRCA founder-mutation testing amongst: 1) all women in the population age 30 years or older and 2) just those with a strong FH (≥10% mutation risk). The model assumes that BRCA carriers are offered risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy and annual MRI/mammography screening or risk-reducing mastectomy. Model probabilities utilize the Genetic Cancer Prediction through Population Screening trial/published literature to estimate total costs, effects in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), cancer incidence, incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and population impact. Costs are reported at 2010 prices. Costs/outcomes were discounted at 3.5%. We used deterministic/probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) to evaluate model uncertainty.

RESULTS:

Compared with FH-based testing, population-screening saved 0.090 more life-years and 0.101 more QALYs resulting in 33 days' gain in life expectancy. Population screening was found to be cost saving with a baseline-discounted ICER of -£2079/QALY. Population-based screening lowered ovarian and breast cancer incidence by 0.34% and 0.62%. Assuming 71% testing uptake, this leads to 276 fewer ovarian and 508 fewer breast cancer cases. Overall, reduction in treatment costs led to a discounted cost savings of £3.7 million. Deterministic sensitivity analysis and 94% of simulations on PSA (threshold £20000) indicated that population screening is cost-effective, compared with current NHS policy.

CONCLUSION:

Population-based screening for BRCA mutations is highly cost-effective compared with an FH-based approach in AJ women age 30 years and older.

PMID:
25435542
PMCID:
PMC4301704
DOI:
10.1093/jnci/dju380
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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