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Stem Cell Reports. 2015 Jan 13;4(1):90-102. doi: 10.1016/j.stemcr.2014.10.014. Epub 2014 Nov 26.

Oxymetholone therapy of fanconi anemia suppresses osteopontin transcription and induces hematopoietic stem cell cycling.

Author information

1
Oregon Stem Cell Center, Department of Pediatrics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA. Electronic address: zhangqi@ohsu.edu.
2
Oregon Stem Cell Center, Department of Pediatrics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA.
3
Department of Pathology, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
4
NW VA Cancer Research Center, VA Medical Center Portland, Portland, OR 97239, USA.
5
Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0032, Japan.

Abstract

Androgens are widely used for treating Fanconi anemia (FA) and other human bone marrow failure syndromes, but their mode of action remains incompletely understood. Aged Fancd2(-/-) mice were used to assess the therapeutic efficacy of oxymetholone (OXM) and its mechanism of action. Eighteen-month-old Fancd2(-/-) mice recapitulated key human FA phenotypes, including reduced bone marrow cellularity, red cell macrocytosis, and peripheral pancytopenia. As in humans, chronic OXM treatment significantly improved these hematological parameters and stimulated the proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. RNA-Seq analysis implicated downregulation of osteopontin as an important potential mechanism for the drug's action. Consistent with the increased stem cell proliferation, competitive repopulation assays demonstrated that chronic OXM therapy eventually resulted in stem cell exhaustion. These results expand our knowledge of the regulation of hematopoietic stem cell proliferation and have direct clinical implications for the treatment of bone marrow failure.

PMID:
25434823
PMCID:
PMC4297866
DOI:
10.1016/j.stemcr.2014.10.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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