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Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol. 2015 Mar;181:54-61. doi: 10.1016/j.cbpa.2014.11.015. Epub 2014 Nov 26.

Is the deep-sea crab Chaceon affinis able to induce a thermal stress response?

Author information

1
Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Equipe Adaptations aux Milieux Extrêmes, UMR 7138 SAE, Quai St Bernard, 75252 Cedex 5 Paris, France. Electronic address: neliamestre@gmail.com.
2
Ocean and Earth Science, University of Southampton, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK.
3
Centre of IMAR of the University of the Azores, Department of Oceanography and Fisheries/UAz-LARSyS Associated Laboratory, 9901-862 Horta, Portugal; MARE-Marine and Environmental Science Center, University of the Azores, 9901-862 Horta, Azores, Portugal.
4
Rua José Saramago, Montenegro, 8005-181 Faro, Portugal.
5
Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Equipe Adaptations aux Milieux Extrêmes, UMR 7138 SAE, Quai St Bernard, 75252 Cedex 5 Paris, France.

Abstract

Fluctuations in the stress level of an organism are expressed in behavioural and molecular changes that can affect its ecology and survival. Our knowledge of thermal adaptations in deep-sea organisms is very limited, and this study investigates the critical thermal maximum (CTmax) and the heat-shock response (HSR) in the deep-sea crab Chaceon affinis commonly found in waters of the North East Atlantic. A mild but significant HSR in C. affinis was noted and one of the lowest CTmax known amongst Crustacea was revealed (27.5 °C at 0.1 MPa; 28.5 °C at 10 MPa). The thermal sensitivity of this species appears to be reduced at in situ pressure (10 MPa), given the slightly higher CTmax and the significant 3-fold induction of stress genes hsp70 form 1 and hsp70 form 2. Although C. affinis deep-sea habitat is characterized by overall low temperature this species appears to have retained its ability to induce a HSR. This capability may be linked with C. affinis' occasional exploitation of warmer and thermally instable hydrothermal vent fields, where it has been found foraging for food.

KEYWORDS:

CTmax; Crustacea; Heat-shock response; High pressure; Stenothermy; hsp70

PMID:
25434602
DOI:
10.1016/j.cbpa.2014.11.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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