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Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 2015 Jan;45(1):185-201. doi: 10.1016/j.cvsm.2014.09.010.

Feline rehabilitation.

Author information

1
Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, 2407 River Drive, Knoxville TN 37996, USA.
2
Department für Kleintiere und Pferde, Veterinärmedizinische Universität, Veterinärplatz 1, 1210 Wien, Austria.
3
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Dept. #3253, 615 McCallie Avenue, Chattanooga, TN 37403-2598, USA.
4
Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, NCSU CVM VHC #2563, 1052 William Moore Drive, Raleigh, NC 27607-4065, USA. Electronic address: djmarcel@ncsu.edu.

Abstract

Cats have orthopedic problems, including osteoarthritis, fractures, and luxations that are positively impacted by physical rehabilitation. Most cats have an independent behavior that requires using a tactful approach to rehabilitation. Cats often do well with manual therapy and electrophysical modalities. Feline rehabilitation sessions may be shorter than canine rehabilitation sessions. Cats do best with therapeutic exercises when these exercises are linked to hunting, playing, or feeding.

KEYWORDS:

Cat; Cryotherapy; Electrical stimulation; Massage; Physical therapy; Rehabilitation; Therapeutic exercise; Ultrasound

PMID:
25432686
DOI:
10.1016/j.cvsm.2014.09.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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