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Science. 2015 Jan 2;347(6217):1258524. doi: 10.1126/science.1258524. Epub 2014 Nov 27.

Mosquito genomics. Extensive introgression in a malaria vector species complex revealed by phylogenomics.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA. Eck Institute for Global Health, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA.
2
Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA.
3
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA.
4
Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, University of Geneva Medical School, rue Michel-Servet 1, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, rue Michel-Servet 1, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
5
The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.
6
Department of Entomology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA. The Interdisciplinary PhD Program in Genetics, Bioinformatics, and Computational Biology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.
7
The Interdisciplinary PhD Program in Genetics, Bioinformatics, and Computational Biology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.
8
Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Scienze Biochimiche, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
9
Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
10
Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
11
Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK.
12
Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA.
13
Eck Institute for Global Health, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA. Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA.
14
Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. mwh@indiana.edu nbesansk@nd.edu.
15
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA. Eck Institute for Global Health, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA. mwh@indiana.edu nbesansk@nd.edu.

Abstract

Introgressive hybridization is now recognized as a widespread phenomenon, but its role in evolution remains contested. Here, we use newly available reference genome assemblies to investigate phylogenetic relationships and introgression in a medically important group of Afrotropical mosquito sibling species. We have identified the correct species branching order to resolve a contentious phylogeny and show that lineages leading to the principal vectors of human malaria were among the first to split. Pervasive autosomal introgression between these malaria vectors means that only a small fraction of the genome, mainly on the X chromosome, has not crossed species boundaries. Our results suggest that traits enhancing vectorial capacity may be gained through interspecific gene flow, including between nonsister species.

PMID:
25431491
PMCID:
PMC4380269
DOI:
10.1126/science.1258524
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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