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Scand J Public Health. 2015 Feb;43(1):76-82. doi: 10.1177/1403494814560842. Epub 2014 Nov 27.

Muscular strength and physical function in elderly adults 6-18 months after a 12-week resistance exercise program.

Author information

1
The Icelandic Gerontological Research Center, Landspitali University Hospital & University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital & Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland ogg@hi.is.
2
Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital & Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
3
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Iceland.
4
The Icelandic Gerontological Research Center, Landspitali University Hospital & University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Department of Geriatrics, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.

Abstract

AIMS:

Benefits of resistance exercise in elderly people are well documented; however, sustaining these benefits can be difficult and adherence is often poor. Muscular strength and physical function usually decline after a supervised resistance exercise program (REP). We investigated these changes in older adults during an observational follow-up and whether leisure time physical activity (LTPA) or unsupervised resistance exercise (RE) limit these changes.

METHODS:

Subjects (N = 236, 73.7 ± 5.7 years, 58.2% female) had participated in a supervised 12-week REP. Quadriceps strength and timed-up-and-go performance (TUG) at follow-up were compared to values before and after REP. Multivariate statistics were used to predict changes in strength or function.

RESULTS:

Two hundred and eleven (90.3%) participants completed REP and 149 (63.1%) completed follow-up (11.4 ± 2.9 months). Quadriceps strength at follow-up decreased significantly compared to after REP (-27N), but was higher than before REP (+ 30N). TUG did not decrease during follow-up and was better than before REP (-0.9 seconds). LTPA (+ 38.0N, p < 0.001) and RE (+31.6N, p = 0.006) predicted strength at follow-up, although they did not completely prevent loss of strength during follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

quadriceps strength declines after a 12-week resistance exercise program in older adults. Neither LTPA nor RE completely prevents loss of quadriceps strength during follow-up, although they limited the loss. TUG did not change during follow-up and was better at follow-up than before the start of the resistance exercise program.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01074879.

KEYWORDS:

Resistance exercise; detraining; muscular strength; old; physical activity

PMID:
25431460
DOI:
10.1177/1403494814560842
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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