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J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2014 Nov 28;16:94. doi: 10.1186/s12968-014-0094-9.

Simplified post processing of cine DENSE cardiovascular magnetic resonance for quantification of cardiac mechanics.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics and Saha Cardiovascular Research Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA. bkf@gatech.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance using displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) is capable of assessing advanced measures of cardiac mechanics such as strain and torsion. A potential hurdle to widespread clinical adoption of DENSE is the time required to manually segment the myocardium during post-processing of the images. To overcome this hurdle, we proposed a radical approach in which only three contours per image slice are required for post-processing (instead of the typical 30-40 contours per image slice). We hypothesized that peak left ventricular circumferential, longitudinal and radial strains and torsion could be accurately quantified using this simplified analysis.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We tested our hypothesis on a large multi-institutional dataset consisting of 541 DENSE image slices from 135 mice and 234 DENSE image slices from 62 humans. We compared measures of cardiac mechanics derived from the simplified post-processing to those derived from original post-processing utilizing the full set of 30-40 manually-defined contours per image slice. Accuracy was assessed with Bland-Altman limits of agreement and summarized with a modified coefficient of variation. The simplified technique showed high accuracy with all coefficients of variation less than 10% in humans and 6% in mice. The accuracy of the simplified technique was also superior to two previously published semi-automated analysis techniques for DENSE post-processing.

CONCLUSIONS:

Accurate measures of cardiac mechanics can be derived from DENSE cardiac magnetic resonance in both humans and mice using a simplified technique to reduce post-processing time by approximately 94%. These findings demonstrate that quantifying cardiac mechanics from DENSE data is simple enough to be integrated into the clinical workflow.

PMID:
25430079
PMCID:
PMC4246464
DOI:
10.1186/s12968-014-0094-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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